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Sleep Disordered Breathing

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a sleep breathing disorder in which a person stops breathing during sleep.  


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Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

Occurs when the muscles and tissues in the airway collapse and block off the airway, preventing airflow. When the oxygen in the brain becomes low enough, the sleeper partially awakens, the obstruction in the throat clears and the flow of …


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SLEEP WELL - LIVE WELL

More than 50 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders. Despite this growing statistic, unfortunately over 90% remain undiagnosed. Although there are over 80 classifications of sleep disorders, they are broken down in four major areas: sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, and restless leg syndrome. Sleep apnea is the most common sleep disorder affecting over 18 million Americans.

The consequences of untreated sleep apnea can range from mild to severe, including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, brain damage, diabetes, depression, obesity, fatigue, tired driving, and impotency. Sleep apnea and related sleep disorders should not be taken lightly and can lead to serious health related issues. Most heart attacks that occur at night have been linked to Sleep Apnea. Are you tired of being tired and never feeling great? With the escalating sleep crisis in America, now is the time to get help.

Dr. Ron Margolies

About Our Office

Meet Dr. Ron Margolies

Dr. Ron Margolies graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and then trained at St. Albans Naval Hospital in Queens, NY before going into private practice. From the start of his career, he has focused on the comprehensive care of his patients and the connection between oral health and overall well-being. In line with this philosophy, Dr. Margolies became interested in the importance of airway health, specifically airway obstruction and its effect on overall health. As a result, he has expanded his practice to offer a dental solution to patients with a medical diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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Sleep Disordered Breathing

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a sleep breathing disorder in which a person stops breathing during sleep. The tissues in the throat collapse, cutting off the airway despite efforts to breathe. Apnea is defined as “a cessation of airflow for 10 seconds or more.” This can occur dozens and sometimes even hundreds of times an hour, depending on the severity of the condition. The result of an apnea (or airway obstruction) is a reduction in oxygen in the blood and, as a result, a reduction in oxygen to our vital organs.

Oral Appliance Therapy

The gold standard for treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a CPAP machine. A CPAP is Continuous Positive Air Pressure applied through a nasal mask. An Oral Appliance is an alternative to CPAP, for those with OSA who are either CPAP intolerant or have mild to moderate OSA. Oral Appliances are placed in the mouth and are worn much like an orthodontic appliance or sports mouth protector. Worn during sleep to prevent the collapse of the tongue and soft tissues in the back of the throat, oral appliances promote adequate air intake and help to provide normal sleep in people who snore and have sleep apnea.

Our Services

In our quest to serve our patients’ needs and overall health and wellness, we provide education about airway disorders, offer in-home Sleep Testing to determine the presence and severity of an airway disorder, and work with Primary Care Physicians (PCPs) and Specialists. Once a diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea has been made, we fabricate oral appliances as a comfortable alternative to treatment with a CPAP. To see if you suffer from a sleep breathing disorder, please complete our 5 minute sleep survey. You are minutes away from relief and a better quality of life!

Who Is At Risk For Sleep Apnea?

Even though sleep apnea can affect anyone regardless of age, weight, and gender, there are a few factors that indicate a higher likelihood of having sleep apnea. If you experience any of the following, your chances of having sleep apnea are greater: mouth breathing, overweight, increased neck size, family history, use of alcohol or sedatives, smoking, being a male, Age, narrowed airway, snoring, excessive daytime fatigue, enlarged tonsils or jaw structure.

TAKE a quick, online sleep survey now to see if you could be at risk for sleep apnea. Click here.

Sleep Apnea Statistics

– Doctors estimate that 9.1% of men and 4% of women have sleep apnea.

-18-25 million Americans (1 in every 15) are living with sleep apnea.

– It is estimated that fewer than 10% have been diagnosed, or have taken a sleep study.

– A person afflicted with untreated obstructive sleep apnea is up to 4 times more likely to have a stroke, as well as 3 times more likely to have heart disease.

– Approximately 50% of all patients who have hypertension, or high blood pressure, are also afflicted with obstructive sleep apnea.

– People suffering from OSA are as much as 6 times more likely to be involved in a car crash than those without sleep disorders. This is due to the fact that they are drowsy from lack of sleep.

TAKE a quick, online sleep survey now to see if you could be at risk for sleep apnea. Click here.

Measuring Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is measured by the number of times you stopped or reduced breathing per hour. Together, these events are counted and known as the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI).

A sleep study will measure your AHI as well as the drop in your blood-oxygen levels to help determine if you suffer from sleep apnea and the severity of the disease. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, your sleep study results will indicate mild, moderate or severe sleep apnea.

Oral Appliances are placed in the mouth and are worn much like an orthodontic appliance or sports mouth protector. Worn during sleep to prevent the collapse of the tongue and soft tissues in the back of the throat, oral appliances promote adequate air intake and help to provide normal sleep in people who snore and have sleep apnea.

Oral appliances can be used as the first-line therapy for patients who have been diagnosed with mild-to-moderate obstructive sleep apnea. They are also used for severe obstructive sleep apnea patients that cannot tolerate their prescribed CPAP. Oral appliances can also be used in conjunction with other therapies such as continuous positive air pressure (CPAP). Determination of proper therapy is made by joint consultation of a sleep physician and a qualified sleep medicine dentist.

CPAP (continuous positive air pressure applied through a nasal mask) is the most common and standard form of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The CPAP machine consists of a face or nasal mask that is connected to a pump, providing a positive flow of air into the nasal passages in order to keep the airway open. This pressure ensures that the airway doesn’t collapse during sleep. CPAP is recommended as the first line of treatment for patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. Patients with mild-to-moderate sleep apnea can usually choose which therapy they would prefer.

While not considered as the first line of treatment for snoring or sleep apnea, surgery may be an effective option for patients who cannot tolerate C-PAP or oral appliance therapy. With many surgical options available, it is up to the surgeon to find where the obstruction is in the patient’s upper airway or nasal passage and determine what the best solution is. Surgery is typically more effective in the treatment of snoring than for sleep apnea.

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Our Office

1800 Rockaway Avenue
Suite 204
Hewlett, NY 11557

Our Hours

Monday: 9am-8pm
Tuesday: 8am-6pm
Wednesday: 8am-12pm
Thursday: 8am-5pm
Friday: CLOSED
Saturday: 8am-1pm
Sunday: CLOSED

Contact Us

info@nycompdent.com
P: 516-593-2100
F: 516-593-3134

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Meet Dr. Ron Margolies

Dr. Ron Margolies graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and then trained at St. Albans Naval Hospital in Queens, NY before going into private practice. From the start of his career, he has focused on the comprehensive care of his patients and the connection between oral health and overall well-being. In line with this philosophy, Dr. Margolies became interested in the importance of airway health, specifically airway obstruction and its effect on overall health. As a result, he has expanded his practice to offer a dental solution to patients with a medical diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Dr. Margolies places great importance on the proper function of the teeth, gums, and jaw as the foundation of an outstanding natural smile to last a lifetime. He is a member of many professional organizations, including the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the International College of Oral Implantology, the American Academy of Osseointegration, and the Academy of General Dentistry. He has held staff appointments at Nassau County Medical Center and Long Beach Hospital. Dr. Margolies enjoys teaching other dentists about the relationship between aesthetics and function in comprehensive and implant dentistry, and has published articles and given lectures, both nationally and internationally.

When he is not in the office or teaching, you will find him spending time with his family, preferably on the water.

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